Getting Rid of Dog Urine Smell

getting rid of dog urine
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Whatever age your dog, accidents happen.  As a dog owner, it’s expected.  The issue is getting rid of dog urine smell.  And, the other ‘stuff’s’ odor, too.  Not to worry, we’ll give you some suggestions for removing those tough odors.  We’ll also give you some pointers just in case this is a common occurrence for your pup.

Is Your Pup Using Indoors as Their Outdoors?

If you find that your pup is regularly peeing or pooping indoors, it’s helpful to understand why.  Here are a few of the most common reasons:

  • If you have a senior pet, they may be finding it hard to get up to go, when it’s time to ‘get up and go’.  If that’s the case, you may want to visit the veterinarian.  They’ll be able to tell you if there are any underlying issues with your pet.
  • The lingering scent of your animal’s urine and feces is an indicator to them that they are in the proper place to eliminate it.  If previous clean-up efforts are leaving behind an odor, know that your dog’s super-sniffer is finding it. 
  • Introducing a new family member is a big change for a dog.  Whether it’s a new baby or another pet, they may be seeking additional attention from you.
  • Stressful times will make all of us act a little out of character.  For instance, if you’re moving homes, expect Fido to have a few off-days in his normal potty routine.
  • Finally, underlying health issues for pets of any age can cause them to have trouble with their bladder.  Seek out time with your vet to discuss the issue.

Getting Rid of Dog Urine Smell – Why is it So Difficult?

If you come from a long line of dog owners, you know that pet accidents are some of the most difficult orders to remove. That’s because they are biological. 

Dog urine is absorbed by the carpet (or furniture fabric) as acid that damages fibers.  Once dried, the urine leaves behind an alkaline residue.  If urine is not cleaned with a cleaning product made especially for cleaning pet messes, it may result in a dog urine odor that lasts for weeks, months, or years.  Ewww.

If you own a dog, you may already have a ‘recipe’ or two up your sleeve for getting rid of dog urine smell.  Let us know how ours below compare.  If you are new to dog ownership, you may enjoy these suggestions.

Cleaning Up Dog Accidents

A Fresh Piddle

If you’ve just noticed your dog peeing on the wood floors, carpet, or furniture, wipe it up quickly.  To help the absorbing process, it is helpful to stand on (if it’s on the floor) layers of paper towels until most of the wetness is eliminated.  If it’s the ‘other stuff’, remove all solids quickly.  Use a pet-stain specific solution to complete clean-up (more on that below).

Dried or Older Spots

Suppose you didn’t notice a pee spot until well after it’s dried?  Your first instinct may be to rent a steam cleaner.  Well, that’s a rookie move.  The heat will set the odor and the stain, permanently.  The better solution is rinsing the area thoroughly with water using a wet vac. Continue saturating and vacuuming that area until it is clean.  While it is faster with a wet vac, this can also be accomplished manually.

Pet Stain Specific – Commercial Solution

To completely remove any residue and the smell, try an enzymatic cleaner.  Be sure to use one made specifically for pet stains.  These cleaners are bio-based and work on a molecular level to break down these stains.

Pet Stain Specific – DIY Solution

A DIY solution is great when you prefer little or no chemicals, or you’re in a pinch and need something immediately.  If you have Dawn dish soap in the house, you’re in luck.

Mix ½ cup hydrogen peroxide with ½ cup of the blue Dawn dish soap (reports say blue is best).  This mixture also works on a molecular level to break down stains and kill bacteria.

Add this solution to a spray bottle and cover the affected area.  Allow it to sit, working its magic, for about one minute.  Scrub with a bristle brush.  Spray again with water and remove liquids with a clean rag or layers of paper towels until dry.

NOTE:  Hydrogen peroxide may have a bleaching affect.  Test on a small area before full use.

For more information about this subject or general questions you can contact:

Christi Knight, CPDT with Posh Paws Pet Care, LLC
843.900.0438
Visit our website at PoshPawsPetCareSC.com
Or send us a note from our contact page here.

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